Sleep To Dream Her

So, not too long ago my roommates commented that I was snoring fairly loudly, loudly enough for them to hear, and the alarming state of my sleep led me to be concerned for the long term ramifications for my life and health. Fortunately, Portland is well-blessed with areas for sleep studies, and my frequent and alarming posts about sleeping difficulties suggested that it would be wise to deal with my sleep troubles as soon as it was practicable to do so [1]. So, upon hearing an advertisement for a sleep study place that happened to be near where I live on the Tigard side of my general neighborhood, I scheduled an appointment that happened to fall during the time when I was staying elsewhere, since that was the earliest I was able to schedule it. Since I tend to write about many areas of interest in my life, I figured it would be worthwhile to write about my general experiences so far regarding sleep, to be updated as necessary.

When I arrived at the towers were the doctor’s office was located, I found parking and the office itself to be easy to find. Once I walked to the first floor office, I had my forms almost all filled out, with only a bit more to write, and while I waited for the doctor to arrive I looked to the table in front of some comfortable chairs for some reading. The waiting room was well stocked with reading materials, and I picked up the Encyclopedia of Shakespeare’s writings to read. I turned to the entry on Much Ado About Nothing, one of my favorite plays by Shakespeare, which talked about the difficulties in love between characters and the witty but insecure flirtatious banter between two others, where fears of loyalty are omnipresent and where wicked and evil designs threaten the desired love and relationships that people are looking for, where on top of this the problem of noting and understanding the true character of others is made difficult by prejudice and fear. Obviously, it is a play that relates very strongly to my life, and the encyclopedia was thoughtfully written by people who clearly know a lot about good theater as well as the history of drama. It looks like a book to at least check out of the library to read for myself at some point, perhaps soon.

I did not have a chance to read far in the book before I was called to sit in a dental chair with a trainee sleep technician who asked me a lot of questions and weighed me. We spoke at some length about common difficulties with sleep and I shared my harrowing family history when it came to sleep apnea and sleep apnea treatment, as my father and paternal aunt died before the age of 60 due to heart attacks that were at least partially brought on by sleep apnea. Both the sleep technician and the doctor, to whom I had to repeat the story to in greater detail, shuddered to hear my story of family suffering. My troubled sleep, in other words, is a potential life and death issue, and something that must be taken seriously. I found it intriguing that the technician assumed that bed partners would generally be the ones to first notice troubled sleeping patterns, but as I have never had any bed partners, my snoring had to reach a more public level to be noted by others. It was intriguing to answer the many questions about allergies and other health conditions, to paint a picture of what is being dealt with. When the doctor came in, he asked my permission to take a bit of extra time to use his examination of various elements of my mouth and jaw to teach the trainee technician. I had no trouble with this, being the sort of person who is patient to poking and prodding and all of that sort of business. I was told during this time that I was an unusually easy-going and gracious sort of person, and that is something that I always appreciate hearing, as not everyone would easily think of me as being gracious and easy-going in all contexts. In measuring various aspects of my mouth, I was asked about the removal of my wisdom teeth, and also commented on the fact that I have an apparent overbite from my bottom jaw being too far behind my top jaw, which orthodontists attempted to resolve during my childhood by my wearing a retainer to hold the top jaw back, rather than from any attempts to pull the bottom jaw forward. I was found to have a somewhat large neck (17″, which had been measured earlier by my mother and foster mother of sorts, so I remembered that measurement) and to have a narrow jaw, which is of interest. Apparently my general teeth health appears good, which is always nice, given my general aversion to dentists. I tend not to greatly enjoy people messing around with my mouth or being too close to me physically unless they are friendly about it.
So, not too long ago my roommates commented that I was snoring fairly loudly, loudly enough for them to hear, and the alarming state of my sleep led me to be concerned for the long term ramifications for my life and health. Fortunately, Portland is well-blessed with areas for sleep studies, and my frequent and alarming posts about sleeping difficulties suggested that it would be wise to deal with my sleep troubles as soon as it was practicable to do so [1]. So, upon hearing an advertisement for a sleep study place that happened to be near where I live on the Tigard side of my general neighborhood, I scheduled an appointment that happened to fall during the time when I was staying elsewhere, since that was the earliest I was able to schedule it. Since I tend to write about many areas of interest in my life, I figured it would be worthwhile to write about my general experiences so far regarding sleep, to be updated as necessary. When I arrived at the towers were the doctor’s office was located, I found parking and the office itself to be easy to find. Once I walked to the first floor office, I had my forms almost all filled out, with only a bit more to write, and while I waited for the doctor to arrive I looked to the table in front of some comfortable chairs for some reading. The waiting room was well stocked with reading materials, and I picked up the Encyclopedia of Shakespeare’s writings to read. I turned to the entry on Much Ado About Nothing, one of my favorite plays by Shakespeare, which talked about the difficulties in love between characters and the witty but insecure flirtatious banter between two others, where fears of loyalty are omnipresent and where wicked and evil designs threaten the desired love and relationships that people are looking for, where on top of this the problem of noting and understanding the true character of others is made difficult by prejudice and fear. Obviously, it is a play that relates very strongly to my life, and the encyclopedia was thoughtfully written by people who clearly know a lot about good theater as well as the history of drama. It looks like a book to at least check out of the library to read for myself at some point, perhaps soon. I did not have a chance to read far in the book before I was called to sit in a dental chair with a trainee sleep technician who asked me a lot of questions and weighed me. We spoke at some length about common difficulties with sleep and I shared my harrowing family history when it came to sleep apnea, as my father and paternal aunt died before the age of 60 due to heart attacks that were at least partially brought on by sleep apnea. Both the sleep technician and the doctor, to whom I had to repeat the story to in greater detail, shuddered to hear my story of family suffering. My troubled sleep, in other words, is a potential life and death issue, and something that must be taken seriously. I found it intriguing that the technician assumed that bed partners would generally be the ones to first notice troubled sleeping patterns, but as I have never had any bed partners, my snoring had to reach a more public level to be noted by others. It was intriguing to answer the many questions about allergies and other health conditions, to paint a picture of what is being dealt with. When the doctor came in, he asked my permission to take a bit of extra time to use his examination of various elements of my mouth and jaw to teach the trainee technician. I had no trouble with this, being the sort of person who is patient to poking and prodding and all of that sort of business. I was told during this time that I was an unusually easy-going and gracious sort of person, and that is something that I always appreciate hearing, as not everyone would easily think of me as being gracious and easy-going in all contexts. In measuring various aspects of my mouth, I was asked about the removal of my wisdom teeth, and also commented on the fact that I have an apparent overbite from my bottom jaw being too far behind my top jaw, which orthodontists attempted to resolve during my childhood by my wearing a retainer to hold the top jaw back, rather than from any attempts to pull the bottom jaw forward. I was found to have a somewhat large neck (17″, which had been measured earlier by my mother and foster mother of sorts, so I remembered that measurement) and to have a narrow jaw, which is of interest. Apparently my general teeth health appears good, which is always nice, given my general aversion to dentists. I tend not to greatly enjoy people messing around with my mouth or being too close to me physically unless they are friendly about it. After a discussion of various matters, it was suggested that I take a detailed blood test, which might reveal whether there are issues with diabetes or oxygen level (or uric acid level) in my blood. I kept the matter in mind, especially because it will take place on a Friday morning and also require prior fasting, both of which are areas I am not sure about at present, even if it would be useful research potentially. After this I had to fill out some more forms related to insurance coverage, and pick up the sleep machine for the test, and also watched a couple of videos, one of which explained how to use the machine and the other of which was about sleep apnea in general. With that, I returned to the place where I have been staying, and where I would conduct the test in a comfortable bed according to the general pattern in which I sleep, on my back and not for as long as I would like. The procedure was straightforward enough–first one washes and dries the forehead, and then one peels off the strips for the forehead and places them in a comfortable location when the hair has been swept away. Then one places a twin camera unit in the nostrils and tightens the cord and places bandages on the face to keep the lines in face, at which point one goes to bed, laying on one’s back, allowing ten seconds for the machine to turn on before one falls asleep. It took a bit of time to get used to the fact that there were camera units in my nostrils, but eventually exhaustion took over and I slept as deeply as normal, with odd dreams that while less malign than often, were no less odd, at which point I woke up and put the machine back in the box for it to be delivered back to the sleep center. And who knows what they will find that will be worthy of investigation. My sleeping, after all, is a terrifying matter, and not likely to be a simple problem to solve. We can hope, though. [1] See, for example: https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress.com/2014/11/06/sleep-an-over-determined-problem/ https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress.com/2014/06/27/while-the-world-sleeps-under-lead-gray-skies/ https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress.com/2014/04/05/even-while-we-sleep-we-will-find-you-acting-on-your-best-behavior/ https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress.com/2013/04/28/asleep-at-last/ https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress.com/2013/03/28/i-should-be-sleeping/ https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress.com/2013/02/21/robbers-of-sleep/ https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress.com/2012/09/08/sleep-is-for-the-weak/ https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress.com/2011/03/22/only-so-much-time-in-a-day-a-musing-on-polyphasic-sleep/ https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress.com/2015/07/22/someones-been-stealing-my-ambien/

After a discussion of various matters, it was suggested that I take a detailed blood test, which might reveal whether there are issues with diabetes or oxygen level (or uric acid level) in my blood. I kept the matter in mind, especially because it will take place on a Friday morning and also require prior fasting, both of which are areas I am not sure about at present, even if it would be useful research potentially. After this I had to fill out some more forms related to insurance coverage, and pick up the sleep machine for the test, and also watched a couple of videos, one of which explained how to use the machine and the other of which was about sleep apnea in general. With that, I returned to the place where I have been staying, and where I would conduct the test in a comfortable bed according to the general pattern in which I sleep, on my back and not for as long as I would like. The procedure was straightforward enough–first one washes and dries the forehead, and then one peels off the strips for the forehead and places them in a comfortable location when the hair has been swept away. Then one places a twin camera unit in the nostrils and tightens the cord and places bandages on the face to keep the lines in face, at which point one goes to bed, laying on one’s back, allowing ten seconds for the machine to turn on before one falls asleep. It took a bit of time to get used to the fact that there were camera units in my nostrils, but eventually exhaustion took over and I slept as deeply as normal, with odd dreams that while less malign than often, were no less odd, at which point I woke up and put the machine back in the box for it to be delivered back to the sleep center. And who knows what they will find that will be worthy of investigation. My sleeping, after all, is a terrifying matter, and not likely to be a simple problem to solve. We can hope, though.

[1] See, for example: https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress.com/2014/11/06/sleep-an-over-determined-problem/
https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress.com/2014/06/27/while-the-world-sleeps-under-lead-gray-skies/
https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress.com/2014/04/05/even-while-we-sleep-we-will-find-you-acting-on-your-best-behavior/
https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress.com/2013/04/28/asleep-at-last/
https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress.com/2013/03/28/i-should-be-sleeping/
https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress.com/2013/02/21/robbers-of-sleep/
https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress.com/2012/09/08/sleep-is-for-the-weak/
https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress.com/2011/03/22/only-so-much-time-in-a-day-a-musing-on-polyphasic-sleep/
https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress.com/2015/07/22/someones-been-stealing-my-ambien/

About nathanalbright

I'm a person with diverse interests who loves to read. If you want to know something about me, just ask.
This entry was posted in Musings and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to Sleep To Dream Her

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