Book Review: Abortion: The Ultimate Exploitation Of Women

Abortion: The Ultimate Exploitation Of Women, by Brian E. Fisher

[Note: This book was provided free of charge by Author’s Blog tours in exchange for an honest review.]

This book, with its provocative title, throws down the gauntlet to both men and women in dealing with abortion. This is a book that is both fair-minded as well as confrontational, full of striking arguments and deep ironies, meticulously researched and uncompromising but also full of compassion for those who have struggled with this horror in their personal lives. As an abstinant single man who has thus far managed to avoid promiscuity (a positive) but also the sort of economic and marital security that I wish out of life (a negative), I am not necessarily the target of this book, except its strong appeal to men to behave in mature and responsible ways and to take responsibility for our actions and of the model that we set for others.

The first part of the book, “Men Started It,” is a fascinating historical look at how abortion came to be seen as a woman’s issue and as a fundamental right. At its core, support for abortion springs from two origins: an elite-driven desire to control social issues (and potentially restive populations of poor, vulnerable, and minority populations) by selectively limiting the population [1], and a desire for people to escape the responsibility for sexual promiscuity, including adultery and fornication, by seeking to ‘eliminate the evidence’ of their actions. Far from endorsing abortion, the feminists of the 19th century were starkly against it, seeing it as violence and degredation against women. They were right. Few self-avowed feminists speak more eloquently than the author about the dignity of women and how abortion harms the mental and physical and relational health of women in a profound way. That he does this without heaping blame on women themselves for the abortion issue is a gentlemanly and gracious act, one that deserves to be recognized and appreciated.

The second part of the book, “Men Oppress With It,” examines the tangled history of abortion and its connection with eugenics as well as forced sterilizations by corrupt regimes all over the world [2]. Although this book is not devoted to biblical issues, taking instead an approach that is focused on political science, public health, and social history, those who are knowledgeable about biblical history will know that the use of abortion as a tool of political and social violence against innocent children who happen to be part of the wrong social group goes back to the violence of Ammon against Israel [3] as well as by Egypt against its Israelite slave population. The way in which abortion clinics are highly disproportionally aimed at minority populations while pretending to support their aims is a shame and a travesty.

It is with the third section of the book, “Men Can Stop It,” that this book becomes full of optimism but all full of responsibility. As gracious and gentlemanly as this book is to the plight of women abandoned by men who wish to avoid responsibility for taking care of their own flesh and blood, this book is very severe on immature and ungodly men whose porn addictions have objectified generations of women, and whose lack of interest in “manning up” for the fruits of their own adulteries and fornications has led to a huge emotional and spiritual burden both for themselves but especially the women in their lives. By addressing the breakdown of family and community support for women, as well as the root causes of a lack of opportunity for men, this book seeks to encourage men to mentor, to respect the women in their lives, and to be loyal and faithful to the wives of their youth, or to save themselves for their future wives. This is a high calling, but with the help of God and the encouragement of others, it is a worthy one. After all, the lives of many millions of innocent children are at stake. Far from being worthless eaters and barriers to our happiness and well-being, unplanned children as well as children with disabilities (the disproportionate sufferers of infanticide) can be spurs to maturity, compassion, and personal development. Why harm ourselves and commit such a grave sin against the vulnerable who deserve our protection rather than our violence?

[1] This is not a new problem. See, for example:

Abortion: The Ultimate Exploitation Of Women, by Brian E. Fisher

[Note: This book was provided free of charge by Author’s Blog tours in exchange for an honest review.]

This book, with its provocative title, throws down the gauntlet to both men and women in dealing with abortion. This is a book that is both fair-minded as well as confrontational, full of striking arguments and deep ironies, meticulously researched and uncompromising but also full of compassion for those who have struggled with this horror in their personal lives. As an abstinant single man who has thus far managed to avoid promiscuity (a positive) but also the sort of economic and marital security that I wish out of life (a negative), I am not necessarily the target of this book, except its strong appeal to men to behave in mature and responsible ways and to take responsibility for our actions and of the model that we set for others.

The first part of the book, “Men Started It,” is a fascinating historical look at how abortion came to be seen as a woman’s issue and as a fundamental right. At its core, support for abortion springs from two origins: an elite-driven desire to control social issues (and potentially restive populations of poor, vulnerable, and minority populations) by selectively limiting the population [1], and a desire for people to escape the responsibility for sexual promiscuity, including adultery and fornication, by seeking to ‘eliminate the evidence’ of their actions. Far from endorsing abortion, the feminists of the 19th century were starkly against it, seeing it as violence and degredation against women. They were right. Few self-avowed feminists speak more eloquently than the author about the dignity of women and how abortion harms the mental and physical and relational health of women in a profound way. That he does this without heaping blame on women themselves for the abortion issue is a gentlemanly and gracious act, one that deserves to be recognized and appreciated.

The second part of the book, “Men Oppress With It,” examines the tangled history of abortion and its connection with eugenics as well as forced sterilizations by corrupt regimes all over the world [2]. Although this book is not devoted to biblical issues, taking instead an approach that is focused on political science, public health, and social history, those who are knowledgeable about biblical history will know that the use of abortion as a tool of political and social violence against innocent children who happen to be part of the wrong social group goes back to the violence of Ammon against Israel [3] as well as by Egypt against its Israelite slave population. The way in which abortion clinics are highly disproportionally aimed at minority populations while pretending to support their aims is a shame and a travesty.

It is with the third section of the book, “Men Can Stop It,” that this book becomes full of optimism but all full of responsibility. As gracious and gentlemanly as this book is to the plight of women abandoned by men who wish to avoid responsibility for taking care of their own flesh and blood, this book is very severe on immature and ungodly men whose porn addictions have objectified generations of women, and whose lack of interest in “manning up” for the fruits of their own adulteries and fornications has led to a huge emotional and spiritual burden both for themselves but especially the women in their lives. By addressing the breakdown of family and community support for women, as well as the root causes of a lack of opportunity for men, this book seeks to encourage men to mentor, to respect the women in their lives, and to be loyal and faithful to the wives of their youth, or to save themselves for their future wives. This is a high calling, but with the help of God and the encouragement of others, it is a worthy one. After all, the lives of many millions of innocent children are at stake. Far from being worthless eaters and barriers to our happiness and well-being, unplanned children as well as children with disabilities (the disproportionate sufferers of infanticide) can be spurs to maturity, compassion, and personal development. Why harm ourselves and commit such a grave sin against the vulnerable who deserve our protection rather than our violence?

[1] This is not a new problem. See, for example:

Abortion: The Ultimate Exploitation Of Women, by Brian E. Fisher

[Note: This book was provided free of charge by Author’s Blog tours in exchange for an honest review.]

This book, with its provocative title, throws down the gauntlet to both men and women in dealing with abortion. This is a book that is both fair-minded as well as confrontational, full of striking arguments and deep ironies, meticulously researched and uncompromising but also full of compassion for those who have struggled with this horror in their personal lives. As an abstinant single man who has thus far managed to avoid promiscuity (a positive) but also the sort of economic and marital security that I wish out of life (a negative), I am not necessarily the target of this book, except its strong appeal to men to behave in mature and responsible ways and to take responsibility for our actions and of the model that we set for others.

The first part of the book, “Men Started It,” is a fascinating historical look at how abortion came to be seen as a woman’s issue and as a fundamental right. At its core, support for abortion springs from two origins: an elite-driven desire to control social issues (and potentially restive populations of poor, vulnerable, and minority populations) by selectively limiting the population [1], and a desire for people to escape the responsibility for sexual promiscuity, including adultery and fornication, by seeking to ‘eliminate the evidence’ of their actions. Far from endorsing abortion, the feminists of the 19th century were starkly against it, seeing it as violence and degredation against women. They were right. Few self-avowed feminists speak more eloquently than the author about the dignity of women and how abortion harms the mental and physical and relational health of women in a profound way. That he does this without heaping blame on women themselves for the abortion issue is a gentlemanly and gracious act, one that deserves to be recognized and appreciated.

The second part of the book, “Men Oppress With It,” examines the tangled history of abortion and its connection with eugenics as well as forced sterilizations by corrupt regimes all over the world [2]. Although this book is not devoted to biblical issues, taking instead an approach that is focused on political science, public health, and social history, those who are knowledgeable about biblical history will know that the use of abortion as a tool of political and social violence against innocent children who happen to be part of the wrong social group goes back to the violence of Ammon against Israel [3] as well as by Egypt against its Israelite slave population. The way in which abortion clinics are highly disproportionally aimed at minority populations while pretending to support their aims is a shame and a travesty.

It is with the third section of the book, “Men Can Stop It,” that this book becomes full of optimism but all full of responsibility. As gracious and gentlemanly as this book is to the plight of women abandoned by men who wish to avoid responsibility for taking care of their own flesh and blood, this book is very severe on immature and ungodly men whose porn addictions have objectified generations of women, and whose lack of interest in “manning up” for the fruits of their own adulteries and fornications has led to a huge emotional and spiritual burden both for themselves but especially the women in their lives. By addressing the breakdown of family and community support for women, as well as the root causes of a lack of opportunity for men, this book seeks to encourage men to mentor, to respect the women in their lives, and to be loyal and faithful to the wives of their youth, or to save themselves for their future wives. This is a high calling, but with the help of God and the encouragement of others, it is a worthy one. After all, the lives of many millions of innocent children are at stake. Far from being worthless eaters and barriers to our happiness and well-being, unplanned children as well as children with disabilities (the disproportionate sufferers of infanticide) can be spurs to maturity, compassion, and personal development. Why harm ourselves and commit such a grave sin against the vulnerable who deserve our protection rather than our violence?

[1] This is not a new problem. See, for example:

Abortion: The Ultimate Exploitation Of Women, by Brian E. Fisher

[Note: This book was provided free of charge by Author’s Blog tours in exchange for an honest review.]

This book, with its provocative title, throws down the gauntlet to both men and women in dealing with abortion. This is a book that is both fair-minded as well as confrontational, full of striking arguments and deep ironies, meticulously researched and uncompromising but also full of compassion for those who have struggled with this horror in their personal lives. As an abstinant single man who has thus far managed to avoid promiscuity (a positive) but also the sort of economic and marital security that I wish out of life (a negative), I am not necessarily the target of this book, except its strong appeal to men to behave in mature and responsible ways and to take responsibility for our actions and of the model that we set for others.

The first part of the book, “Men Started It,” is a fascinating historical look at how abortion came to be seen as a woman’s issue and as a fundamental right. At its core, support for abortion springs from two origins: an elite-driven desire to control social issues (and potentially restive populations of poor, vulnerable, and minority populations) by selectively limiting the population [1], and a desire for people to escape the responsibility for sexual promiscuity, including adultery and fornication, by seeking to ‘eliminate the evidence’ of their actions. Far from endorsing abortion, the feminists of the 19th century were starkly against it, seeing it as violence and degredation against women. They were right. Few self-avowed feminists speak more eloquently than the author about the dignity of women and how abortion harms the mental and physical and relational health of women in a profound way. That he does this without heaping blame on women themselves for the abortion issue is a gentlemanly and gracious act, one that deserves to be recognized and appreciated.

The second part of the book, “Men Oppress With It,” examines the tangled history of abortion and its connection with eugenics as well as forced sterilizations by corrupt regimes all over the world [2]. Although this book is not devoted to biblical issues, taking instead an approach that is focused on political science, public health, and social history, those who are knowledgeable about biblical history will know that the use of abortion as a tool of political and social violence against innocent children who happen to be part of the wrong social group goes back to the violence of Ammon against Israel [3] as well as by Egypt against its Israelite slave population. The way in which abortion clinics are highly disproportionally aimed at minority populations while pretending to support their aims is a shame and a travesty.

It is with the third section of the book, “Men Can Stop It,” that this book becomes full of optimism but all full of responsibility. As gracious and gentlemanly as this book is to the plight of women abandoned by men who wish to avoid responsibility for taking care of their own flesh and blood, this book is very severe on immature and ungodly men whose porn addictions have objectified generations of women, and whose lack of interest in “manning up” for the fruits of their own adulteries and fornications has led to a huge emotional and spiritual burden both for themselves but especially the women in their lives. By addressing the breakdown of family and community support for women, as well as the root causes of a lack of opportunity for men, this book seeks to encourage men to mentor, to respect the women in their lives, and to be loyal and faithful to the wives of their youth, or to save themselves for their future wives. This is a high calling, but with the help of God and the encouragement of others, it is a worthy one. After all, the lives of many millions of innocent children are at stake. Far from being worthless eaters and barriers to our happiness and well-being, unplanned children as well as children with disabilities (the disproportionate sufferers of infanticide) can be spurs to maturity, compassion, and personal development. Why harm ourselves and commit such a grave sin against the vulnerable who deserve our protection rather than our violence?

[1] This is not a new problem. See, for example:

https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress.com/2013/01/22/today-in-history-on-january-22-1973-the-united-states-supreme-court-legalized-abortion/

[2] See, for example:

https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress.com/2012/04/16/uzbekistan-and-the-war-on-children/

[3] https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress.com/2011/06/29/for-three-transgressions-and-for-four-amos-on-abortion/

About nathanalbright

I'm a person with diverse interests who loves to read. If you want to know something about me, just ask.
This entry was posted in American History, Book Reviews, Christianity, History, Love & Marriage, Musings and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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