Non-Book Review: Desperta Ferro Antigua Y Medieval: La Guerra De Los Cien Años (1)

Desperta Ferro Antigua Y Medieval:  La Guerra De Los Cien Años (1), by various editors and authors

It should come as little surprise to those who know me that I am interested both in achievable but challenging tasks as well as being kind to outcasts.  In that light, I suppose it is little surprise that after watching this particular popular magazine (in Spanish) languish for so long that I would eventually take pity on it and review it, not least because I can.  Admittedly, Spanish is my second language and my skills at understanding and writing in Spanish are nowhere near the level of my abilities in English.  However, as someone who is quite knowledgeable about the Hundred Years War [1], and who is being asked to review a popular magazine, I felt that the level of Spanish would not be too difficult, at least since the book review itself is to be written in English.  While it was certainly an adventuresome thing to do, it was not something that was entirely ridiculous or out of line.  It merely represents a slight expansion of my usual reading and reviewing into another language, which can demonstrate at least the sort of material I am capable of reading and reviewing.

It is worthwhile to give at least a brief look at the material that can be seen so far.  For one, this is a popular military history magazine, so there are a few advertisements that I can see, including for other issues of this magazine.  There looks to be a great deal of artwork as well as some maps and the writing does not appear to presuppose a great deal of knowledge about the armies and their operations.  To be sure, this magazine is pretty short, so it is going to be a surface-level account.  As someone who has read more than my fair share of Civil War magazines, especially during my youth, this magazine definitely has that flavor about it, of the kind that would appeal to youthful audiences or those who are young art heart and interested in military matters and are not particularly academic in their studies.  Of course, a magazine like this could easily be a gateway sort of material into more scholarly and academic or at least larger accounts of the military efforts of the past.  This particular magazine appears to only look at the first phase of the war, as it ends with the siege of Crecy.  The fact that this magazine is clearly aimed at a popular audience does not in any way mean that this is a poor account.  It looks pretty interesting, in fact.

[1] See, for example:

https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2016/11/19/non-book-review-the-crecy-war/

https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2017/03/24/non-book-review-the-chivalric-biography-of-boucicaut-jean-ii-le-meingre/

https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2012/11/25/scholarly-book-reviews/

https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2016/10/29/non-book-review-henry-of-lancasters-expedition-to-aquitaine-1345-46/

About nathanalbright

I'm a person with diverse interests who loves to read. If you want to know something about me, just ask.
This entry was posted in Book Reviews, History, Military History, Uncategorized and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

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