Down The Rabbit Hole

Recently someone compared me to Lewis Carroll’s famous white rabbit, that somewhat enigmatic and overly scheduled figure of children’s literature. Being someone whose relationship with Carroll and his life and literature has been somewhat complicated [1], I was not sure how to take the comment, whether it was meant as a compliment or a wry and witty observation or even a bit of a putdown. When I queried the person and asked him to explain, he said that he had thought of me as being like the white rabbit because of my overscheduling nature. Since I had to accept the justice of that characterization, since it is one I have made of myself [2], I did not take it as an insult. Instead, I saw it as a somewhat odd but rather appropriate comment in that particular context.

Occasionally, though, my reflection about the white rabbit goes beyond the fact that he is busy, and sometimes goes to the issue of the rabbit hole. As someone who tends to somewhat obsessively look at the views of my posts, and tries to fathom where they are coming from [3], every once in a while (or, more commonly, every day) I go down the rabbit hole of trying to think of what others are trying to look for on my blog. I pour over patterns of blog views, and try to examine the times of days that are the most popular, along with which entries are the most popular to see if I can come up with any conclusions as to what is driving people to look at what they do. I have enough information to know that there are varied times of day, to know that sometimes someone is looking in the evening when I start my blog entries (sometimes in a large batch of up to 60 views at a time), and sometimes at other hours like 5AM when hardly anyone is awake (except for pour souls like me getting ready for work). Given the specific viewing patterns and times, there are some pretty clear indications of what sort of people are likely to be looking, and for what reasons, and yet in the absence of communication (another popular subject of mine to write about) it is unclear exactly which person or people are looking at the same set of concerns over and over again.

A blog like this is part of a conversation. Many of the entries are inspired by books that I read, or songs that I listen to, or conversations or situations in life that spark me to think about something that either was not or could not be said at the time. These ruminations combine with memories and reflections of life and history, of culture and literature, of God’s ways and the complicated ways of men and women. It would be nice if these ruminations and conversations, if they sparked interest or concern (or some combination of the two) in others, would lead to further friendly conversations, as it ought to be obvious to anyone who reads my blog with any regularity that I am a candid and honest person. If you want to know the implications of what I think, it is far more productive to seek to communicate those questions and concerns with me than to either view the same small set of posts over and over again or to share them as subjects of gossip and community concern. After all, if someone is willing to explain themselves (should that be necessary), it would seem that to go to the rabbit about their own rabbit hole would be more profitable than to attempt to pour over the same writings over and over again, unless, of course, they are being read with pleasure. For what is true of Darcy is also true of me in that regard, in that I would not wish to deny readers the pleasure of enjoying my words over and over again, only that I wish to spare them tears of sadness, hours lost to anxious concern or sleepless nights. For my own writing, all too often, is born of just those things that I wish to spare others from, if it is within my power to do so.

[1] See, for example:

https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress.com/2014/05/25/white-rabbits-on-the-run/

https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress.com/2014/09/03/book-review-the-mystery-of-lewis-carroll/

[2] See, for example:

https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress.com/2014/11/03/busy-beavers/

https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress.com/2013/01/30/a-busy-morning/

https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress.com/2014/11/12/the-lonely-hour/

https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress.com/2014/11/10/book-review-bonhoeffer-abridged/

[3] See, for example:

https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress.com/2013/01/24/a-salute-to-freedom-loving-british-settler-colonists/

https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress.com/2011/03/20/you-still-havent-found-what-youre-looking-for/

About nathanalbright

I'm a person with diverse interests who loves to read. If you want to know something about me, just ask.
This entry was posted in Musings and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Down The Rabbit Hole

  1. You give the precise reason for writing the way you do–you invite your readers (and everyone else) to come to you directly if or when they have any questions or comments needing clarification. It’s always been a rule of thumb to “go to the source” if one really wants to know the truth or the viewpoint from which something was said or written. Sadly, the internal make-up within us tends to urge the masses to ignore the obvious and give in to the pleasures of gossiping about appearances. They are often oblivious to the damage they cause. Those who cause the upset enjoy pushing the envelope without regard to anyone else’s reputation, for it gives them the spotlight they crave. They act out this way because their intensive need for ANY kind of attention–even negative–validates them and gives them their feeling of self-worth. And it leaves the innocent party holding the bag.

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