Book Review: Jesus: The Life And Ministry Of God The Son

Jesus:  The Life And Ministry Of God The Son–Collected Insights From A.W. Tozer

[Note:  This book was provided free of charge by Moody Publishers.  All thoughts and opinions are my own.]

It is perhaps little surprise that the author had enough comments about Jesus Christ and His life and purpose to make enough material to combine from several of his books into a collected volume.  Indeed, it is likely that many such authors have that kind of material [1].  The question, of course, is what one does with that material and how one discusses it.  This book is a case where the author is perhaps not the ideal person for the task he has set for himself.  To be sure, Tozer is strong-minded as far as Evangelicals go when it comes to doctrinal matters, and that is certainly the case here (even where our beliefs differ).  Yet there is something of the graciousness that one would expect in the subject that is a bit missing, and that is missing largely because the author spends so much time being tough on doctrine (and tough on people) that he does not strike one as the best example to be writing about Jesus.

This book of a bit more than 150 pages is divided into seventeen chapters, each of which ends with some reflection questions for the reader.  The author discusses Jesus as the self-existent God (1), as God’s express image (2), and as the creator, sustainer, and benefactor (3).  He discusses such matters as the mystery of the incarnation (4), the center of all (6), a miracle worker (7) as well as the people’s savior (8).  He speaks of Jesus Christ as the remedy (9), the offering (10), our mediator (11), and he speaks quite eloquently about the resurrection (12), the ascension (13), and the role of Jesus Christ as the high priest (14) who is ever with us (15).  To be greatly appreciated are his comments about the second coming (16) that are pretty strongly worded against amillennialism, before closing, fittingly, with a look at Jesus Christ as the head of a new creation (17).  There are definitely some aspects of Jesus’ life and ministry (like Jesus as the Lord of the Sabbath) that are overlooked here, and the author seems to be a bit harsh on people like Philip as being full of calculations. It appears at times as if the author takes his own grievances out on his biblical interpretations.

There is certainly much to appreciate here for many readers.  Reading Tozer’s thoughts on anything is enjoyable and insightful, regardless of what the subject may be.  Given the importance of grace, though, to Jesus’ ministry, it would seem as if one would look for someone who was more gracious than Tozer to be the one writing the book.  Even so, if you happen to pick up this book looking for generally sound doctrine and some tough-minded statements about Jesus Christ and His role in salvation and in the lives of believers, you will find what you are looking for and will likely enjoy it.  The questions for this book are definitely strong as well, though it is unclear who wrote them, and some of them are well worth thinking about and for some readers perhaps well worth writing about them as blog entries or short reflection pieces.  Whether or not many readers make use of this depends on a lot of factors.  I am not sure how many people will think of Tozer’s thoughts on Jesus to be something that would be their cup of tea, especially when there are so many options to choose from–I suppose the sales numbers will have to tell that tale for themselves.

[1] See, for example:

https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2018/02/24/book-review-jesus-and-the-jewish-roots-of-the-eucharist/

https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2018/02/24/book-review-the-case-for-jesus/

https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2017/08/05/book-review-the-red-letter-words-of-jesus/

https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2017/04/23/book-review-the-philosophy-of-jesus/

About nathanalbright

I'm a person with diverse interests who loves to read. If you want to know something about me, just ask.
This entry was posted in Bible, Biblical History, Book Reviews, Christianity, History. Bookmark the permalink.

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