Book Review: In Search Of Persons Of Peace

In Search Of Persons Of Peace, by Carolyn Leslie Knight

[Note: This book was provided free of charge by Aneko Books/One Mission Society in exchange for an honest review.]

The concept of peace discussed in this book is peace in the sense of the Hebrew shalom, which not only means peace in the absence of war, but peace as in active wholeness and reconciliation between God and man and mankind with other people. As is the case with the books I have read so far relating to the mission of the One Mission Society [1], this book contains a great deal of enthusiastic commentary on missionary efforts. As someone who has served in the missionary field in Southeast Asia, among the Karen and Lahu peoples, I was familiar with some of the stories discussed in this book, as they are very familiar in missionary circles. The author, in mixing together discussions of biblical people of influence, as well as a discussion of the workings of divine providence as they relate to evangelism efforts, does a skillful job in making this book an inspirational guide to those who practice evangelism in some fashion, whether in their own lives, or as missionaries on some sort of assignment around the world.

In terms of its organization and structure, the author straightforwardly discusses various elements of what it means to be a person of peace, and what qualities they tend to have when it comes to amplifying the ministry of an eveangelist. After introducing the Sandal people of India, as well as the on-the-job training that tends to happen when it comes to recognizing such people and then meeting them, often through divine providence, the author comments on how persons of peace are receptive to learning God’s way, well-known with either a very good or a very bad reputation in their communities, and connected to others, which allows for the message to get out all the more when they convert to Christianity. The author then closes the book with a couple of chapters on wisdom from the Bible as well as some useful parables that deal with preaching the Gospel that are worthwhile to keep in mind.

The strengths of this book are many. The stories mix well-argued biblical discussions, including a very forthright one about Paul’s interactions with Lydia as evidence that he had moved beyond the sexism of the Pharisaic mindset of his time [2], with stories about well-known missionaries in various parts of the world, along with people who are currently involved in missionary efforts, at times at great risk to their lives. At least a few of the people here appear to be engaged in missionary efforts that are particularly dangerous, mostly in the Muslim world, although there was one worrisome example of a clandestine missionary work in a Caribbean country that could not be named, which I supposed to be Cuba. The author herself is also someone who has put her money where her mouth is, so to speak, by serving as a missionary for women caught up in sex trafficking or in the sex industry, the sort of people for whom the message of Jesus Christ giving respect and dignity to all is something of great importance given the fact that being treated as mere objects for gratification takes a heavy toll on the dignity of all too many women [3]. The book is short, but intensely practical, and gives plenty of food for thought and good material for application.

[1] See, for example:

https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress.com/2016/01/10/book-review-another-valley-another-victory/

https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress.com/2015/09/20/book-review-no-reserves-no-retreats-no-regrets/

[2] See, for example:

https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress.com/2015/11/18/the-pattern-of-sabbath-observance-in-the-journeys-of-paul/

https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress.com/2015/08/23/on-the-logistics-of-the-early-church-of-god/

[3] See, for example:

https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress.com/2014/07/04/book-review-how-to-pick-up-a-stripper-and-other-acts-of-kindness/

https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress.com/2013/03/05/scenes-from-a-portland-max-ride/

https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress.com/2014/05/11/real-men-dont-rent-women/

https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress.com/2014/03/09/book-review-highway-to-hell/

https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress.com/2014/01/04/lest-the-land-fall-into-harlotry/

About nathanalbright

I'm a person with diverse interests who loves to read. If you want to know something about me, just ask.
This entry was posted in Bible, Biblical History, Book Reviews, Christianity, History and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Book Review: In Search Of Persons Of Peace

  1. Pingback: Book Review: I Just Saw Jesus | Edge Induced Cohesion

  2. Pingback: Book Review: Questioning Evangelism | Edge Induced Cohesion

  3. Pingback: Life In The Dar Al-Harb | Edge Induced Cohesion

  4. Pingback: Book Review: Culture Of Peace | Edge Induced Cohesion

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