Something Of Gryffindor’s And Ravenclaw’s

Today, in this first of two essays about Harry Potter, in honor of the premiere of the last movie of the series (presumably), I would like to examine the divided romantic loyalties of Harry Potter through the course of the series. I would also like to examine the possessive attitudes of Harry and Ginny toward each other in the sixth and seventh novels and the way in which the Harry Potter series shows Harry’s awakening first about the attractiveness of girls in general, and then about Ginny in particular, examining also the ways in which they signal their attraction in the other through their decisions.

Harry Potter’s First Crush: Cho Chang Of Ravenclaw

Let us first begin by noticing when Harry Potter first appears to be interested in girls. The moment occurs in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, during the chapter “Gryffindor Versus Ravenclaw,” an appropriate name for a chapter that seems to hint at so much of the romantic tensions in the series as a whole. The girl whom Harry finds attractive is Cho Chang, and this is what the reference says: “The Ravenclaw team, dressed in blue, were already standing in the middle of the pitch. Their Seeker, Cho Chang, was the only girl in their team. She was shorter than Harry by about a head, and Harry couldn’t help noticing, nervous as he was, that she was extremely pretty. She smiled at Harry as the teams faced each other behind their captains, and he felt a slight jolt in the reason of the stomach that he didn’t think had anything to do with nerves [1].” From this moment on, we know that Harry Potter’s interest in at least crushes with girls has been awakened. And Cho Chang would be Harry’s first crush, something that his eventual wife Ginny would absolutely never forget.

Much of the romantic plot of Order of the Phoenix is based around the false trail of Cho as partner and the subtle contrast of Ginny. This starts in the Hogwarts Express, where Cho says hi to Harry but does not offer him any help to clean up and then walks away, while Ginny does help quickly and effectively [2]. Cho is busy gossiping and chatting during Umbridge’s welcome speech, not paying attention to the threat, showing herself to be less than serious [3]. Then she allows Ron’s attack of the Tornadoes to overcome her interest in talking one-to-one with Harry [4]. Then she and Harry talk about the weather and have a shy conversation about Harry’s bravery at the owlery [5]. Then Cho brings someone to the first DA meeting who is really more of a ministry supporter and eventually turns Harry and the rest of Dumbledore’s army in to Umbridge [6], though her staring at Harry obviously made a very positive impression [7], as did her saying he made her nervous in the first Room of Requirement DA meeting [8].

The romance heats up when just before winter break Cho kisses Harry under the mistletoe [9], his first kiss (after a near miss with seeing Luna under the mistletoe [10]). The kiss was somewhat awkward and hesitant, given Harry’s lack of experience and confidence with girls, but Harry still comes off as a decent (if someone emotionally immature) young man, particularly worried about her lack of cheer. After all, Harry is not fond of weepy or overly histrionic young women. Just at this point, though, J.K. Rowling makes it obvious that Cho is not the right woman for Harry. Even after Cho gives a subtle hint (that is is belatedly taken) about going out on a date on Valentine’s Day [11], it appears that Harry’s inexperience and Cho’s too-subtle approach is not likely to work very well. Then, of course, there is the disastrous date in Hogsmeade where Cho’s weeping and emotional attempts to find out more about Cedric end up with a massive argument where Cho angrily and jealously mistrusts Harry’s platonic feelings for Hermoine [12]. In short, Cho seriously misjudges Harry and how to relate to him effectively. By the time the fifth year ends she is going out with Ginny’s ex-boyfriend Michael Corner [13] (a fellow Ravenclaw) and her chance with Harry is gone for good. As Ron correctly says, “she’s quite good looking and all that, but you want someone a bit more cheerful [14].” Someone like Ginny, that is.

How Ginny Gets Harry’s Attention And Attraction

Throughout the course of the plot of Order of the Phoenix we see Ginny gain the romantic attention of Harry Potter in very subtle ways, showing herself as a more suitable partner for him than Cho Chang was. It is in Order of the Phoenix that the perceptive reader first becomes more aware of Ginny’s maturity as a young lady and suitability as a romantic partner for Harry Potter. Let us examine how this is done, as it starts from early on in the book.

The first we see if Ginny’s clever (and ultimately successful) plan is to have her respond to Harry’s angry voice brightly, with friendliness, rather than provoking him to anger as Hermoine does. We then see her clever side by her use of dungbombs to tell that her mother has made it impossible to hear the meeting, and her passionate side by her angry response to Percy’s insults of her family’s poverty [15]. Even at the beginning of the fifth novel Ginny is shown as a complex and mature young woman. Her friendship with Hermoine allows her to know what is going on with the Order as soon as Harry does16. Her magical power, the bat-bogey hex, is shown even at this early stage [17], a gift that later allows her to join the Slug Club. Ginny is even shown at the Black residence as having the good sense to close the lid of a dangerous music box [18]. After Harry is cleared of all charges she and the twins do a “war dance” in celebration [19]. On the Hogwarts train she even manages the impressive trick of ensuring herself proximity to Harry by getting a compartment with herself, Harry, Neville, and Luna [20], a foreshadowing of the DA group the four of them would all lead. By this point she has firmly found herself as a genuine friend of Harry Potter, not afraid to be talkative and outgoing around him.

Let us examine the strategies of loyalty, identification, and competence that Ginny used to pique the interest of Harry Potter during his crucial fifth year. First, let us show how Ginny’s loyalty meant a lot to to Ginny’s ultimate success with Harry. First, Ginny shows herself loyal to Hagrid in the carriage ride with Luna [21]. Ginny also shows her loyalty by trying to cheer up Ron before the Gryffindor-Slytherin Quiddich match [22]. Additionally, Ginny shows her loyalty to Harry by helping clear out the area by warning students about colorless, odorless garrotting gas, helping his ruse to talk to Sirius [23]. Most importantly, Ginny shows her loyalty by insisting on going along with Harry, Ron, and Hermoine on the thestrals in the DA rescue attempt of Sirius at the ministry [24]. Of the six young people, all of them would be leaders of the DA at some point, either its first or second incarnation, and of them four of them would end up in couples (and the other two probably should have as well). Clearly Ginny’s loyalty to Harry made a great impact in his opinion of her.

Next let us look at how Ginny’s interpersonal skills allowed her to show Harry that she was suitable as a partner for him. On the one hand, her ferocious candor allowed her to break through Harry’s immature self-absorbed nature when he is moping about possibly being possessed after seeing the attack of Nagini on Mr. Weasley, and forgetting that in Ginny he had someone who knew what it was like to be possessed by Voldemort [25], just as he had a part of Voldemort’s damaged soul inside of him. He would never make that mistake again. On the more positive side, her thoughtful listening to Harry when he was troubled by what he had seen of Snape and his father in the penseive allowed him to avoid raging at her in anger and frustration (as he did so often with Hermoine). Her tactful silence, her gentle and patient attention, and her encouragement showed her as a suitable person to deal with Harry’s dark moods [26]. And Harry at this point begins to appreciate her on a personal level and feel more hopeful. From that point it is not far to romantic interest.

Finally, let us examine how Ginny’s competence allowed her to be seen as a suitable partner to Harry. First, in the Hogwarts express she uses the spell Scourgify to clean Harry of the stinksap after he has embarrassed himself in front of Cho [27] (something that reminds me of my own romantic experiences). Ginny shows her competence at impressions by mimicking Umbridge’s hem-hem, breaking the tension in the first Dumbledore’s Army meeting [28]. She additionally is the one to tell Cho about the first DA meeting at the Room of Requirement, taking a very firm interest in Harry’s love life [29]. Additionally, Ginny names the DA Dumbledore’s Army and overcomes Cho’s choice of the name Defense Association [30]. Additionally, Ginny is shown in the DA as being a very competent witch [31]. Finally, Ginny’s competence is shown by her being the replacement seeker for Gryffindor after Harry’s “lifetime ban [32]” and in her stealing the snitch from under Hufflepuff seeker Summerby’s nose [33] and then wins the Quiddich Cup for Gryffindor by stealing the snitch (and eventually Harry) from right under Cho’s nose as well [34]. There is no doubt that Ginny was a competent, loyal, and passionate young woman—and recognizing those qualities was key in sparking Harry Potter’s interest in her.

If You Can’t Be With The One You Love: Romantic Signaling

Let us now proceed to the unusual ways that both Ginny and Harry signaled their interest in the other when they were unable (or felt unable) to be with the ones they were truly interested in. Through romantic signaling, both Ginny and Harry chose nonthreatening “friends” as dates instead of choosing rivals that would make the other upset. Let us ponder this phenomenon and see its ultimate success.

First, Ginny signaled her interest in Harry by going to the Yule Ball in Goblet of Fire with Neville Longbottom, an nonthreatening roommate of Harry’s [35], unfortunately missing out on her chance to go to the ball with Harry Potter, which she would have no doubt preferred to do. By showing her displeasure of being stuck with Neville but by honoring her commitment, she ended up gaining credibility with both people. She and Neville (along with Luna Lovegood—more on her shortly) led the second Dumbledore’s Army during the ghastly year of the Death Eaters.

However, the romantic signaling did not only work one way. Just as Harry Potter was aware of Ginny’s continuing interest in Harry by her misery at missing a chance to go to the Yule Ball with him, Harry too uses signaling to slyly show Ginny of his interest in her, without consciously being aware of it. When helping Hermoine after a particularly disastrous Transfiguration class, Luna mentions that Ginny has been nice to her even though she misses the Dumbledore’s Army activities. Immediately, thinking of Ginny, Harry Potter asks Luna to the Slug Club Christmas party as a friend, and Ginny, recognizing the signaling, tells Harry that she’s glad. She’s glad Harry chose a friend of hers, someone in her year, and someone completely nonthreatening [36], when Harry could have chosen anyone but did not choose a rival to the girl who had his heart. Ginny is a perceptive enough young woman to understand what that means.

Let us therefore see this pattern of signaling for what it is. Both Harry and Ginny appear to be very intuitive people. They see events and jump, even leap, to conclusions. Since they both communicate in that way, their romantic experiences are similarly calculated. Ginny’s going to the Yule Ball with Neville was an nonthreatening way to leave her heart open for the one she really wanted. So was Harry going to the Slughorn party as a friend with one of Ginny’s friends. Such signaling eventually led both Harry and Ginny to understand the mutual interest.

A Quiet Springtime Love

Let us now examine how it is that J.K. Rowling set up the brief Hogwarts romance of Harry and Ginny at the end of Harry’s sixth (and final) year there. Even though the romance was hinted before, it is rapidly brought to light in Half Blood Prince in a somewhat abrupt way. Let us spend some time examining how this is done, so that it is less abrupt than it may first appear, as there are a lot of people who do not see Harry and Ginny as a good romantic pair.

First, we have the seemingly inevitable setup in the Burrow. The party of three becomes a party of four as Ginny is brought along (perhaps with the connivance of Hermoine) into many of Harry’s private conversations, including his first morning at the Burrow, where Ginny shows anger at Harry’s defense of Fleur’s intelligence [37]. Then we have Harry paying attention (and thankfully managing to escape Ginny’s fury) when at the twins’ joke shop Fred and George refuse to sell love potion to his sister and comments about her rapid going through boyfriends [38]. Ginny gets upset at Ron, but there are some unanswered questions. Since Ginny already had a boyfriend, who was the love potion for? Harry? Then, on the Hogwarts Express, Harry asks Ginny to find a compartment with him, and feels a bit surprised, and chagrined, that Ginny did not normally hang out with him [39]. He had grown a bit accomstomed to her, I suppose, so he then hangs out with his other two Dumbledore’s Army friends Neville and Luna.

At Hogwarts itself the hints keep coming and coming. At the first N.E.W.T. Potions lecture, Harry smells the amorentia love potion and is reminded of something flowery he had smelled at the Burrow [40], presumably Ginny’s perfume. Then, when the source of his potions brilliance is uncovered, and Ginny looks alarmed and angry, he knows exactly what Ginny is concerned about—her possession by Voldemort through the diary horcrux [41]. Clearly he is not the self-absorbed young person he once was. Ginny, for her part, is definitely interested in being kind to Harry, even saying that she might see him in Hogsmeade when he asks [42]—clearly his interest is becoming more obvious.

Harry, at this time, is still not conscious of his own feelings. He first becomes consciously aware that his feelings for her are more than brotherly when Ron confronts Ginny making out with Dean outside of the tower, and Harry feels extremely jealous. In the ensuring argument, Harry avoids taking sides, and Ginny’s wrath is focused on Ron rather than Harry [43]. Harry tries to repress his obvious interest in Ginny by reasoning that she is out-of-bounds because she is Ron’s sister. Nonetheless, despite this effort, Ginny still pops up in his romantic fantasies [44]. As mentioned before, Harry’s asking Luna to the Slughorn Christmas party as a friend seems largely because Luna mentioned Ginny being nice to her, and Ginny seems to understand the friendly gesture for what it’s worth [45]. Ginny then flirtatiously picks out a maggot from Harry’s hair, making Harry feel nervous [46]. By this time it appears that Ginny is a fully accepted member of the group of heroes, as Harry and Ron wait for her so they can all walk together (and Hermoine, jealous of Ron’s relationship with Lavender, refuses to acknowledge him when she sees them all), and Ginny even seems unenthusiastic about leaving them and eating with her boyfriend [47].

At this point, though, the pieces begin to fall together (despite Harry not being all that aware) for Harry and Ginny to end up together. When Harry gets injured in the Hufflepuff match, Ginny comes up to see him [48]. Then Ginny and Dean start arguing about Harry’s injury, Ginny believing it wasn’t funny in the least, and Hermoine (sensibly) wondering why Harry is so interested in whether Ginny is single or not49. Harry’s dreams of using the Felix Felicis to get Dean and Ginny to break up [50], and when he uses it to get the Horcrux memory, he gets the breakup as an added bonus [51]. After this, though, a fierce battle wages inside of Harry’s brain, where he thinks that dating Ginny would betray his friendship with Ron, thanks to Ron’s jealousy about Ginny’s attractiveness [52]. And yet, despite his caution and hesitation, he cannot help but show attention to her to help her through her break-up [53]. After the Sectumsempra disaster, Ginny even sticks up for Harry despite massive punishment, getting into an argument with Hermoine to do so [54].

And then, after Gryffindor wins the cup with Ginny as seeker against Ravenclaw, Harry siezes the chance and kisses her, leading Dean to react angrily and Ron to respond in a puzzled but hardly upset manner [55]. The two were together at last, after nearly six volumes of preparation and a lot of work building up the romance over more than 500 pages of the sixth volume of the series. Needless to say, the whole school decides to gossip about the relationship, and Ron dislikes the attention his sister is receiving again for being astonishingly attractive to the opposite sex56. Snape seems to glory in keeping the loving couple from each other [57], though he would. And yet while Harry and Ginny enjoyed time together as summer approached, he knew like any superhero that he would have to break up with his beloved girlfriend in order to keep her from becoming a target [58]. And so he does, and she, being the true superhero’s girlfriend, accepts that he is only happen hunting the evil villain (Voldemort) and that he has to break up with her, even though he loves her, to protect her [59]. It’s like Spiderman and Mary Jane all over again. At least Harry finds out how Ginny got her interested by acting like herself, a strong-minded and clever (and beautiful) young woman, and not like a love-struck girl, on the (wise) advice of Hermoine.

They Sure Seemed To Act Like They Were Still Together

Even after “breaking up” at the end of Half-Blood Prince, though, Harry and Ginny still acted like they were a couple. Clearly, their breakup was for tactical reasons (not wanting the Death Eaters and Voldemort to go after Ginny) and not because they ceased to feel very deeply about each other. Whatever you may think about the Harry-Ginny romance, clearly the two of them acted in ways to preserve their claim to the other within the pages of Deathly Hallows. Let us now examine how.

First, we have the behavior of Harry and Ginny at the Burrow before the Horcrux-hunting mission begins. When Gabrielle Delacour flirts with Harry, Ginny clears her throat loudly [60]. Later, Ginny lures Harry into her bedroom (!) for an extremely passionate birthday kiss, where Harry helpfully informs her that he’s not going to be seeing any women while he’s off on his mission, before Ron walks in on the two of them [61]. Both of them work to keep the other attached to them, to show each other of their passion and their loyalty. It works. At Fleur’s wedding, Ginny winks at Harry in her low-cut bridesmaid dress, showing off her temptress side, leading Harry to wander off into dreaming about their relationship the previous spring, happy memories that seem unreal to the affection-starved young man [62]. Later Harry, annoyed about Krum’s interest in Ginny at the wedding dance, shows his own jealous side when he tells Krum (while disguised) that Ginny’s boyfriend is a big, jealous type Krum wouldn’t want to cross [63]. Both Harry and Ginny show jealousy at the attractiveness of the other to the opposite sex and even while “single” appear to be acting as if they are still together.

This behavior continues when Harry goes off hunting horcruxes. For one, Harry is afraid of Ginny’s safety starting from the flight after the wedding [64]. He feels the anxious concern for Ron’s family as much as Ron does, seeing as he sees them as his family too (thanks to Ginny) [65]. When they meet up with a couple of runaways (including one of Ginny’s ex-boyfriends), Harry is desperately interested in news about Ginny at Hogwarts, and defends her (as well as Neville and Luna) to the fierce Phineas Nigellus, after panicking about her being tortured [66]. Later, while the horcrux-hunters are traveling, and after Ron has left the party, Harry stares at Ginny’s spot on the Marauder’s Map for hours, hoping she would recognize his care and concern from afar67. When the three reunite and visit Luna’s father, Harry’s thoughts drift to the nearby Burrow where Ginny is, thinking of her fondly still despite knowing the dangers anyone has being connected to him [68]. The book pointedly mentions after the rescue at Malfoy Manor that Ginny sends all of them her love [69]. All throughout the long months of horcrux hunting Ginny and Harry still feel, and act, as if they are still in love with each other.

At the Battle of Hogwarts the romantic tensions between the two heat up even more, making it obvious the two have not really broken up at all. First, Harry sees Ginny’s radiant smile and beauty, even when he is not pleased to see her in danger at Hogwarts [70]. Then Ginny shows her jealous side by refusing to let Cho (her old rival) show Harry Ravenclaw tower, but rather to let the unthreatening friend Luna do so, clearly remembering the stakes of Harry’s heart even in such dangerous times [71]. Harry’s desire to keep Ginny safe when the battle starts causes him to side with her parents over her own desires to fight [72], but Lupin comes up with a sensible compromise that allows her to stay close to the battle even without participating in it [73]. When Fred dies he is nearly overcome with fear that the same fate may have happened to Ginny [74]. Harry thinks that Ginny senses his presence (perhaps love can pierce the invisibility cloak), and longs to let her know that he is alright when she is comforting a little girl [75]. When he gives up his life, or so he thinks, in the Forbidden Forest, his last thought before the Avada Kedavra curse hits him is of Ginny, her passionate look, and the feel of her lips on his [76]. His concern for Ginny’s safety in the final duel causes him momentarily to chase after the threatening Bellatrix rather than the real enemy Voldemort [77]. And after the battle is won, Harry correctly observes in looking at Ginny that there would be hours and days and years to talk with her [78]. And so he did—the two of them married not too long afterwards.

Why Did Harry And Ginny End Up Together?

Let us now close our examination of the divided heart of Harry Potter (in a way that most of our hearts are divided between relationships) by asking the question of why Harry Potter and Ginerva Weasley ended up together. In seeing Ginny first as a very young lady, we are inclined to think of her as a little kid sister long after she has turned into a radiantly beautiful young woman. Let us see what Harry Potter’s appeal is for Ginny and what Ginny’s appeal is for Harry so that we may fairly decide, without undue prejudice, their suitability for each other.

For one, let us note that Harry Potter appeals to Ginny on a variety of levels. At first, it is the Lockhart-like crush of a famous person for a young woman in a large family starving for attention. But she was only ten years old at the time, and she can be forgiven that. Later on, Ginny seems to appreciate his heroic nature from a more personal level, and appreciate his passionate personality as well. Likewise, Harry begins as the chaste protector of his best friend’s sister when rescuing Ginny from Riddle’s diary horcrux, and then gradually respects her as a friend, a competent wizard and Quidduch player in her own right, and as a faithful and passionate young woman whom he trusts and deeply cares for. It is not a quick love, but a very gradual one.

We may better understand Harry Potter’s interest in Ginny if we (like J.K. Rowling) are fond of Jane Austen. The relationship between Harry and Ginny seems to resemble that of Fanny Price and Edmund Bertram in Mansfield Park. The relationship is a complex one, though. Like Fanny, Ginny is the “little sister” who feels jealous about her adopted brother’s interest in an older, more worldly young woman (Maria Crawford and Cho), and like Fanny Price she comes from a family that is large and relatively poor. However, Harry too has elements of Fanny Price in him as well. Harry, like Fanny, is a very damaged soul from years of abuse, and has grave difficulties trusting a potential lover. His dislike of fighting and his problems trusting make it very difficult for someone to genuinely touch his scarred and wounded heart. Ginny, by virtue of being a compassionate and caring young woman, as well as a passionate lover but not a weepy young woman, is able to do so.

The relationship works, on paper as well as in our minds, so long as we remember that a damaged but innocent soul needs a lot of care and has a lot of problems with trust that a normal person is not going to have to deal with. Both Harry and Ginny know what it is like to suffer torment because of great evil, and both are passionate and caring people who nonetheless do not like vocal displays of emotion—and they are both deeply intuitive people. When we understand how J.K. Rowling was inspired by Jane Austen, and how she understands the romantic needs of her romantic hero, we better understand why Harry ended up with Ginny, and why it works on a deep level.

[1] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Prisoner Of Azkaban (London: Bloomsbury, 1999), 191-192.

[2] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Order Of The Phoenix (London: Bloomsbury, 2003), 170.

[3] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Order Of The Phoenix (London: Bloomsbury, 2003), 192.

[4] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Order Of The Phoenix (London: Bloomsbury, 2003), 208.

[5] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Order Of The Phoenix (London: Bloomsbury, 2003) 254-256.

[6] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Order Of The Phoenix (London: Bloomsbury, 2003), 303.

[7] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Order Of The Phoenix (London: Bloomsbury, 2003), 311.

[8] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Order Of The Phoenix (London: Bloomsbury, 2003), 351.

[9] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Order Of The Phoenix (London: Bloomsbury, 2003), 402-404.

[10] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Order Of The Phoenix (London: Bloomsbury, 2003), 400.

[11] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Order Of The Phoenix (London: Bloomsbury, 2003), 466-467.

[12] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Order Of The Phoenix (London: Bloomsbury, 2003), 494-497.

[13] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Order Of The Phoenix (London: Bloomsbury, 2003), 762-763.

[14] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Order Of The Phoenix (London: Bloomsbury, 2003), 763.

[15] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Order Of The Phoenix (London: Bloomsbury, 2003), 66-69.

[16] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Order Of The Phoenix (London: Bloomsbury, 2003), 92.

[17] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Order Of The Phoenix (London: Bloomsbury, 2003), 94.

[18] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Order Of The Phoenix (London: Bloomsbury, 2003), 108.

[19] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Order Of The Phoenix (London: Bloomsbury, 2003), 142.

[20] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Order Of The Phoenix (London: Bloomsbury, 2003), 166.

[21] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Order Of The Phoenix (London: Bloomsbury, 2003), 181.

[22] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Order Of The Phoenix (London: Bloomsbury, 2003), 357.

[23] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Order Of The Phoenix (London: Bloomsbury, 2003), 651.

[24] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Order Of The Phoenix (London: Bloomsbury, 2003), 669-673.

[25] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Order Of The Phoenix (London: Bloomsbury, 2003), 441-442.

[26] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Order Of The Phoenix (London: Bloomsbury, 2003), 577-578.

[27] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Order Of The Phoenix (London: Bloomsbury, 2003), 170.

[28] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Order Of The Phoenix (London: Bloomsbury, 2003), 309.

[29] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Order Of The Phoenix (London: Bloomsbury, 2003), 344.

[30] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Order Of The Phoenix (London: Bloomsbury, 2003), 347.

[31] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Order Of The Phoenix (London: Bloomsbury, 2003), 349.

[32] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Order Of The Phoenix (London: Bloomsbury, 2003), 399.

[33] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Order Of The Phoenix (London: Bloomsbury, 2003), 507.

[34] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Order Of The Phoenix (London: Bloomsbury, 2003), 621.

[35] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Goblet Of Fire (London: Bloomsbury, 2000), 349.

[36] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Half-Blood Prince (London: Bloomsbury, 2005), 311-312.

[37] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Half-Blood Prince (London: Bloomsbury, 2005), 94.

[38] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Half-Blood Prince (London: Bloomsbury, 2005), 120-121.

[39] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Half-Blood Prince (London: Bloomsbury, 2005), 136.

[40] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Half-Blood Prince (London: Bloomsbury, 2005), 183.

[41] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Half-Blood Prince (London: Bloomsbury, 2005), 192.

[42] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Half-Blood Prince (London: Bloomsbury, 2005), 242.

[43] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Half-Blood Prince (London: Bloomsbury, 2005), 286-290.

[44] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Half-Blood Prince (London: Bloomsbury, 2005), 306.

[45] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Half-Blood Prince (London: Bloomsbury, 2005), 311-312.

[46] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Half-Blood Prince (London: Bloomsbury, 2005), 339.

[47] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Half-Blood Prince (London: Bloomsbury, 2005), 350-352.

[48] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Half-Blood Prince (London: Bloomsbury, 2005), 417.

[49] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Half-Blood Prince (London: Bloomsbury, 2005), 424.

[50] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Half-Blood Prince (London: Bloomsbury, 2005), 472.

[51] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Half-Blood Prince (London: Bloomsbury, 2005), 478.

[52] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Half-Blood Prince (London: Bloomsbury, 2005), 515-516.

[53] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Half-Blood Prince (London: Bloomsbury, 2005), 518-519.

[54] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Half-Blood Prince (London: Bloomsbury, 2005), 530.

[55] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Half-Blood Prince (London: Bloomsbury, 2005), 533-534.

[56] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Half-Blood Prince (London: Bloomsbury, 2005), 535-536.

[57] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Half-Blood Prince (London: Bloomsbury, 2005), 539.

[58] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Half-Blood Prince (London: Bloomsbury, 2005), 634.

[59] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Half-Blood Prince (London: Bloomsbury, 2005), 646-647.

[60] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows (London: Bloomsbury, 2007), 93.

[61] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows (London: Bloomsbury, 2007), 98-100.

[62] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows (London: Bloomsbury, 2007), 121.

[63] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows (London: Bloomsbury, 2007), 126-127.

[64] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows (London: Bloomsbury, 2007), 136.

[65] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows (London: Bloomsbury, 2007), 145.

[66] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows (London: Bloomsbury, 2007), 245-249.

[67] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows (London: Bloomsbury, 2007), 256.

[68] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows (London: Bloomsbury, 2007), 326-327.

[69] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows (London: Bloomsbury, 2007), 414.

[70] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows (London: Bloomsbury, 2007), 468.

[71] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows (London: Bloomsbury, 2007), 470-471.

[72] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows (London: Bloomsbury, 2007), 486.

[73] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows (London: Bloomsbury, 2007), 488.

[74] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows (London: Bloomsbury, 2007), 515.

[75] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows (London: Bloomsbury, 2007), 558.

[76] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows (London: Bloomsbury, 2007), 564.

[77] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows (London: Bloomsbury, 2007), 589.

[78] J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows (London: Bloomsbury, 2007), 597.

About nathanalbright

I'm a person with diverse interests who loves to read. If you want to know something about me, just ask.
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13 Responses to Something Of Gryffindor’s And Ravenclaw’s

  1. Vani says:

    Loved it!!! especially after all the venom one hears sprouted about Ginny, as well as harry and ginny in blogs and forums. I am surprised how people who call themselves ardent hp fans could not appreciate the subtle nuances of h/g’s relationship. To me it was beautiful and poignant romance, even with the little screen time that was dedicated to it. Thank you for writing such a detailed and insightful piece.

    • You’re very welcome. I think a lot of people dislike Harry and Ginny’s romance because they can’t accept Ginny growing up from a starstruck girl of ten to a mature, confident, and very attractive young woman of 16. The fact that the films don’t tend to give her character growth much attention (they are far more focused on the friendship of Harry and Hermoine, with Ron as the third wheel) does not help matters. But an alert reader of the novels can pick up a lot of information about how Rowling brings Harry and Ginny together gradually and subtly. I’m glad I was able to convey that detail successfully for you.

  2. moodynamer says:

    Wow. this post is really great. Thanks for sharing your thoughts. I really love the connection and romance between Harry and Ginny. I think you’ve a big potential in following JK’s footstep.

    I absolutely agree that Ginny’s exposure and growth in films were not really focused. People who have not read the books may get confused about Bonnie Wright’s character in the film. Their romance was kind of abrupt in the movies. However, all was well, as JK would say.

    • That is very high praise. I am not economical enough in my praise at this time to follow in Ms. Rowling’s footsteps, but I do greatly enjoy writing. Indeed, all was well, even if those who read the books had an advantage over those who just followed the movies.

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