Book Review: Parents! Loose Your Children From Bondage

Parents! Loose Your Children From Bondage (Enhanced Edition) by Abolaji Muyiwa Akinbo

[Note: This book was provided free of charge by the author in exchange for an honest review.]

Every once in a while I like to read a self-published book from an African author, or at least an international author with a particular style [1], as I find it a change of pace from the sort of books I read normally. While this book was not about a subject of immediate personal interest, seeing as I am not a parent, after all, I figured it might be a read, but the book exceeded every potential expectation in terms of its worth. It is hard to wonder how a book that barely reaches 100 pages could be considered an enhanced and expanded edition, but this book was apparently even smaller in its original form. That said, this is a book that can hold its own in worth against books many times its size, even if it is written about a subject that makes it clear why this book was self-published. It is hard to imagine many American publishers willing to take on an extremely blunt book written largely about the spiritual warfare that young people face, with a special focus on demon influence and possession.

What this book offers that sets it apart from other books in the encouraging/admonishing parents and teens that I have read is that this book seeks both to categorize different children (and teenagers, and even adult children) and offer specific guidance based on which biblical children someone appears to be like. While much of this diagnosis is harsh [2], not all of it is [3], and there are prayers focused as well. Of note as well is the way that the author begins by calling on parents to recognize how their own unmanaged life trauma and patterns of behavior have shaped their children, and the way in which parental neglect and abuse allows for the influence of dark spirits that can take children down the wrong path. Since parents don’t stop worrying about their children or what their children are up to when they turn eighteen years of age, this book has a much wider relevance than may be assumed to be the case by many who encounter this book. This may be the only book I have ever read that urges its readers to fast and then pray for the exorcism of a demon from afflicted children, and it is that sort of bracing and bluntly honest advice that makes this a book to ponder over as its perspective is far different from that of any parenting advice most people would be familiar with in the United States.

After a short introduction, the book contains four chapters with very straightforward points. The first chapter points out that the parents must be the ones to break cycles of sin through repentance and reflection. A parent with unrecognized and unmitigated trauma will likely bring about the same sort of cycles in the lives of children, and it is hard work to root out the effects of a difficult life so as to minimize the harm that others suffer because of it. After this the book talks about parents and children, both in terms of the blessing that comes from raising up godly children and the intense frustration that comes when children are particularly obstinate about following evil. After this comes a lengthy list of doors that should be closed to remove opportunities for children to be vulnerable to demonic influence, including home setting, school, bad friends, abuse, family backgrounds rich in conflict and poverty, and the like. After this comes the way out, which involves a lot of prayer, a serious focus on teaching God’s way in the family, and even some very serious efforts at exorcism, particularly for older children who are either teens or (potentially) young adults like those discussed in the book: Absalom, Rehoboam, Hophni and Phineas, and so on.

This book does have some minor copyediting issues, but for the most part it is a cleanly edited book that is written with a lot of biblical discussion and not a lot of fluff. This is a book that gets to its point and makes it clear that parents have a serious responsibility in protecting their children from spiritual harm even in a world that is full of evil influences. Not all of this book will make sense to Western audiences, who may not be familiar with the Naga–snake demons of South and Southeast Asia, or with the idea of spirit marriages or covenants with demons, all of which is extremely terrifying material for most readers, but enough of the points of the book are clear that it should be a bracing and thought-provoking read for anyone, whether they are parents or not. Kudos to the author for taking the spiritual state of young people seriously, even if few people reading this book, whether they are parents or young people, are likely to find everything about this book enjoyable to read.

[1] See, for example:

https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress.com/2015/02/04/book-review-the-monogamy-mystery/

https://edgeinducedcohesion.wordpress.com/2014/03/26/book-review-the-secret-place-of-the-most-high-for-women/

[2] See, for example, this passage from page xi:

“Today we have NATURALIZED the devil. When he is manifesting his attitude through our children, we tend to believe that it is the growth strange. The Child, who already knows how to dish out abuses and curse words when his/her mates know how to shout “hallelujah”, is becoming a natural devil if he/she is not checked.”

[3] See, for example, this moving discussion from page 45:

“Jeremiah was the prophet ordained from the womb. As a child he got overwhelmed by the gravity of his assignment and wanted a way out. These are children whose divine call is evident from birth and sometimes it overwhelms them. The hand of God is evident on them even in their childhood and for this reason, many things will come against them to discourage them. Parents of such kids need to be particularly observant and careful to protect and support these incredible children. They will cry a lot not because of emotional or chemical imbalance, but because of the weight of their assignment just like Jeremiah, which many times they will not fully understand.”

About nathanalbright

I'm a person with diverse interests who loves to read. If you want to know something about me, just ask.
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